06.09.2011 – 05.11.2011
Klara Hobza Prequel

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Klara Hobza, Prequel, 2011, film still

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Klara Hobza, Prequel, installation view

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Klara Hobza, Prequel, 2011, film still

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Klara Hobza, Prequel, 2011, film still

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Klara Hobza, installation view

Klara Hobza* You Just Might Get It, 2011

Klara Hobza, You Just Might Get It, 2011

Klara Hobza, You Just Might Get It, 2011 (detail)

Klara Hobza, You Just Might Get It, 2011 (detail)

Klara Hobza* You Just Might Get It, 2011 (detail) Door bells, cables, transformers * dimensions variable

Klara Hobza, You Just Might Get It, 2011 (detail)

 

For her exhibition, Prequel Klara Hobza has developed a signalling device and a simple doorbell installation as part of a nocturnal campaign that uses Morse code to get in touch with the citizens of Berlin.

Prequel is an amalgamation of performance, historical material, and site-specificity, in which Hobza again takes up a project she started in New York in 2004: Morse Code Communication

She contrasts this outmoded method of telecommunication with the pace of everyday life in the twenty-first century: our smartphones, e-mails, and social networking sites. Besides occupying public space immaterially, she also provides an impressive demonstration of one private individual’s attempt to communicate with the public using manageable means that nevertheless have their own heroic connotations.

Hobza’s artistic practice combines sculpture, video, photography, drawing, and conceptual approaches, as well as performance and narrative content. Her intentions are more than merely absurd and obsessive – they also strive for precision. Their themes deal with central questions about proximity and alienation, about our dreams and our failures. With an almost casual ease, her simple, unpretentious work engenders a confrontation with issues of communication, cultural criticism, and self-awareness.